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Khyentse Foundation Celebrates 20 Years in the Service of the Buddhadharma

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Every single word spoken by the Buddha is excellent and precious.

Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche

Khyentse Foundation, a nonprofit founded by the renowned Bhutanese lama, filmmaker, and author Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse Rinpoche, on Friday marked 20 years of of far-reaching and profoundly impactful work in the service of the Buddhadharma.

“In 2001, the seed of Khyentse Foundation was officially planted, and on this day, 5 November, we celebrate 20 years of operation,” Khyentse Foundation stated in a message shared on social media. “Since the beginning, KF has been an organization of offering, and it is only because of your support, your labor, and your well wishes that we are able to continue in the service of the Buddhadharma.”

Khyentse Foundation is a nonprofit organization founded by Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche in 2001 with the aim of promoting the Buddha’s teaching and supporting all traditions of Buddhist study and practice. The foundation’s activities include major text preservation and translation projects, support for monastic colleges in Asia, a worldwide scholarship and awards program, development of Buddhist studies at major universities, training and development for Buddhist teachers, and developing new modes of Dharma-inspired education for children.

“Thank you to everyone who is part of the foundation, to our generous donors, our incredible, hardworking staff and volunteers, and our grantees and collaborating institutions who do the work that will preserve the dharma for future generations,” the foundation shared. “The vision of Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche is vast, and together we work to realize his aspirations. As we enter our 21st year, let’s celebrate together all of our unique contributions.

The foundation’s primary focus is supporting lay and monastic individuals and institutions engaged in the practice and study of the Buddhadharma, providing the means and opportunity for sincere scholarship and practice that can help the authentic Dharma to thrive and prosper for the benefit of future generations and all sentient beings.

“Khyentse Foundation creates conditions for the study and practice of the Buddhadharma to flourish,” the foundation states on its website. “Grants and scholarships are given through a process of applications, direct initiatives, and partnerships. Our support is nonsectarian and global, for institutions and individuals worldwide.” (Khyentse Foundation)

Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse Rinpoche. From khyentsefoundation.org

Born in Bhutan in 1961, Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche is the son of Thinley Norbu Rinpoche and was a close student of the Nyingma master Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche (1910–91). He is recognized as the third incarnation of Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo, founder of the Khyentse lineage, and the immediate incarnation of Jamyang Khyentse Chökyi Lodrö (1893–1959). In addition to Khyentse Foundation, his projects include Siddhartha’s Intent, an international collective of Buddhist groups supporting Rinpoche’s Buddhadharma activities by organizing teachings and retreats, distributing and archiving recorded teachings, and transcribing, editing, and translating manuscripts and practice texts; 84000, a non-profit global initiative to translate the words of the Buddha and make them available to all; Lotus Outreach, which directs a range of projects to ensure the education, health, and safety of vulnerable women and children in the developing world; and the Lhomon Society, which promotes sustainable development in Bhutan through education.

Rinpoche is the author of several books, including: What Makes You Not a Buddhist (2006), Not For Happiness (2012), and The Guru Drinks Bourbon? (2016), and has garnered renown within and outside of the global Buddhist community for the feature-length films he has written and directed: The Cup (1999), Travellers and Magicians (2004), Vara: A Blessing (2012), and Hema Hema: Sing Me a Song While I wait (2016).

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Khyentse Foundation

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